Wood species type BTU values of a cord 
burning wood in a wood stove

As you can see from the chart below, the famed red oak is not the highest on the list. It is surpassed by 
13 other varieties that have as much as 37% more BTUs per cord!

This can mean much longer burn times and less loading. If you have this type of wood available, save it
for those cold, harsh Jan and Feb days.

Avoid Burning softwoods because of the very low BTUs obtained when burning and some softwoods
put out much more creosote.

 

Wood Species

Osage Orange (Hedge)
Hickory, Shagbark
Eastern Hornbeam
Ironwood
Beech, Blue
Birch, Black
Locust, Black
Hickory, Bitternut
Locust, Honey
Apple
Mulberry
Oak, White
Beech, High
Maple, Sugar
Oak, Red
Ash, White
Birch, Yellow

Juniper, Rocky Mtn
Elm, Red
Coffeetree, Kentucky
Hackberry
Tamarack
Birch, Gray
Birch, Paper
Birch, White
Walnut, Black
Cherry
Ash, Green
Cherry, Black
Elm, American
Elm, White (Russion, Siberian)
Sycamore
Ash, Black
Maple, Red

Softwoods

Pounds/ cord

4,728
4,327
4,267
4,016
3,890
3,890
3,890
3,832
3,832
4,100
3,712
4,012
3,757
3,757
3,757
3,689
3,689

3,150
3,112
3.112
3,247
3,247
3,179
3,179
3,179
3,192
3,120
2,880
2,880
3,052
3,052
2,808
2,992
2,924

1,000 BTU's per cord

32.9
27.7
27.3
27.1
26.8
26.8
26.8
26.7
26.7
26.5
25.8
25.7
24
24
24
23.6
23.6

21.8
21.6
21.6
20.8
20.8
20.3
20.3
20.3
20.2
20
19.9
19.9
19.5
19.5
19.5
19.1
18.7

 

Fir, Douglas
Boxelder
Alder, Red
Pine, Jack
Pine, Norway
Pine, Pitch
Catalpa
Hemlock
Spruce, Black
Pine, Ponderosa
Aspen
Butternut
Spruce
Willow
Fir, Balsam
Pine, White (Eastern, Western)
Fir, Concolor (White)
Basswood
Buckeye, Ohio
Cottonwood
Cedar, White
2,900
2,797
2,710
2,669
2,669
2,669
2,360
2,482
2,482
2,380
2,290
2,100
2,100
2,100
2,236
2,236
2,104
2,108
1,984
2,108
1,913
18.1
17.9
17.2
17.1
17.1
17.1
16.4
15.9
15.9
15.2
14.7
14.5
14.5
14.5
14.3
14.3
14.1
13.8
13.8
13.5
12.2

 

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